Auto Europe Travel Blog - Advice to Travel With


Tranquil Iceland

Welcome to Iceland: the most sparsely populated country in Europe with summer’s midnight sun and Northern Lights during the colder months, a country with geysers and over 170 geothermal pools. This is where the nature is protected by Icelandic people from industrialism. Iceland is a place for those, who find it challenging to relax in crowded cities, appreciate the severe nature of glaciers, highlands, waterfalls and active volcanos, and seek tranquility in order to hear their thoughts. The spirit of Iceland may perhaps be what Sigur Rós translated into their music…

Whale watching in Iceland

Whale watching in Iceland

Nature
Located in the south of the island, Landmannalaugar is the most often visited uninhabited area of Iceland with colourful mountains and lava fields. These highlands will amaze you with the variety of colours where pink, green, purple, blue, and gold intertwine with volcano rocks. This most popular hiking area is open for tourists from from June till late September, when the main road is closed. East from Landmannalaugar you will find the largest national park in Europe – the Vatnajökull National Park of 12,000 square kilometers land shaped by glacier ice and volcanic activity.

Icelandic Horses

Icelandic Horses

Wild Life
Iceland is home to ingenious horse breed: Icelandic Horse – a pony size horse performing an extra gait in comparison to other breeds. Icelandic law does not allow to import horses or let the exported animals come back in order to keep the low number of diseases the Icelandic Horses are exposed to.
Skjálfandi and Eyjafjörður bays on the north of the island offer whale watching excursions. Taking a trip on an oakwood boat in summer can cause you a heart stop, as spotting dolphins, humpbacks or blue whales is an experience of a lifetime.

Climate
Iceland is not really an ice land. The North Atlantic Current brings high temperatures to the country that stays warmer than its altitude counterparts in the world. Ice incursions happen very seldom. It snows mostly in the north of the island and highlands are the coldest place in Iceland. Summer temperatures circulate little above 10 Celsius degrees and during the winter months the temperatures rarely reach below the freezing point.

Reykjavik

Reykjavik

Getting there
There are two major airports in Iceland: Keflavik International Airport, located approximately 50 kilometers from the capital, and Reykjavik Airport, servicing mainly domestic flights. Auto Europe offers car hire at each of these airports. Next to family cars, we also have a large choice of SUV’s, which have lately become very popular holiday vehicles in Iceland. Getting there by water: there are ferry cruises from Hirtshals in Denmark and Tórshavn in the Faroe Islands. Enjoy the Icelandic spirit!

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